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gin's Introduction

Gin Web Framework

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Gin is a web framework written in Go (Golang). It features a martini-like API with performance that is up to 40 times faster thanks to httprouter. If you need performance and good productivity, you will love Gin.

Contents

Installation

To install Gin package, you need to install Go and set your Go workspace first.

  1. You first need Go installed (version 1.16+ is required), then you can use the below Go command to install Gin.
go get -u github.com/gin-gonic/gin
  1. Import it in your code:
import "github.com/gin-gonic/gin"
  1. (Optional) Import net/http. This is required for example if using constants such as http.StatusOK.
import "net/http"

Quick start

# assume the following codes in example.go file
$ cat example.go
package main

import (
  "net/http"

  "github.com/gin-gonic/gin"
)

func main() {
  r := gin.Default()
  r.GET("/ping", func(c *gin.Context) {
    c.JSON(http.StatusOK, gin.H{
      "message": "pong",
    })
  })
  r.Run() // listen and serve on 0.0.0.0:8080 (for windows "localhost:8080")
}
# run example.go and visit 0.0.0.0:8080/ping (for windows "localhost:8080/ping") on browser
$ go run example.go

Benchmarks

Gin uses a custom version of HttpRouter

See all benchmarks

Benchmark name (1) (2) (3) (4)
BenchmarkGin_GithubAll 43550 27364 ns/op 0 B/op 0 allocs/op
BenchmarkAce_GithubAll 40543 29670 ns/op 0 B/op 0 allocs/op
BenchmarkAero_GithubAll 57632 20648 ns/op 0 B/op 0 allocs/op
BenchmarkBear_GithubAll 9234 216179 ns/op 86448 B/op 943 allocs/op
BenchmarkBeego_GithubAll 7407 243496 ns/op 71456 B/op 609 allocs/op
BenchmarkBone_GithubAll 420 2922835 ns/op 720160 B/op 8620 allocs/op
BenchmarkChi_GithubAll 7620 238331 ns/op 87696 B/op 609 allocs/op
BenchmarkDenco_GithubAll 18355 64494 ns/op 20224 B/op 167 allocs/op
BenchmarkEcho_GithubAll 31251 38479 ns/op 0 B/op 0 allocs/op
BenchmarkGocraftWeb_GithubAll 4117 300062 ns/op 131656 B/op 1686 allocs/op
BenchmarkGoji_GithubAll 3274 416158 ns/op 56112 B/op 334 allocs/op
BenchmarkGojiv2_GithubAll 1402 870518 ns/op 352720 B/op 4321 allocs/op
BenchmarkGoJsonRest_GithubAll 2976 401507 ns/op 134371 B/op 2737 allocs/op
BenchmarkGoRestful_GithubAll 410 2913158 ns/op 910144 B/op 2938 allocs/op
BenchmarkGorillaMux_GithubAll 346 3384987 ns/op 251650 B/op 1994 allocs/op
BenchmarkGowwwRouter_GithubAll 10000 143025 ns/op 72144 B/op 501 allocs/op
BenchmarkHttpRouter_GithubAll 55938 21360 ns/op 0 B/op 0 allocs/op
BenchmarkHttpTreeMux_GithubAll 10000 153944 ns/op 65856 B/op 671 allocs/op
BenchmarkKocha_GithubAll 10000 106315 ns/op 23304 B/op 843 allocs/op
BenchmarkLARS_GithubAll 47779 25084 ns/op 0 B/op 0 allocs/op
BenchmarkMacaron_GithubAll 3266 371907 ns/op 149409 B/op 1624 allocs/op
BenchmarkMartini_GithubAll 331 3444706 ns/op 226551 B/op 2325 allocs/op
BenchmarkPat_GithubAll 273 4381818 ns/op 1483152 B/op 26963 allocs/op
BenchmarkPossum_GithubAll 10000 164367 ns/op 84448 B/op 609 allocs/op
BenchmarkR2router_GithubAll 10000 160220 ns/op 77328 B/op 979 allocs/op
BenchmarkRivet_GithubAll 14625 82453 ns/op 16272 B/op 167 allocs/op
BenchmarkTango_GithubAll 6255 279611 ns/op 63826 B/op 1618 allocs/op
BenchmarkTigerTonic_GithubAll 2008 687874 ns/op 193856 B/op 4474 allocs/op
BenchmarkTraffic_GithubAll 355 3478508 ns/op 820744 B/op 14114 allocs/op
BenchmarkVulcan_GithubAll 6885 193333 ns/op 19894 B/op 609 allocs/op
  • (1): Total Repetitions achieved in constant time, higher means more confident result
  • (2): Single Repetition Duration (ns/op), lower is better
  • (3): Heap Memory (B/op), lower is better
  • (4): Average Allocations per Repetition (allocs/op), lower is better

Gin v1. stable

  • Zero allocation router.
  • Still the fastest http router and framework. From routing to writing.
  • Complete suite of unit tests.
  • Battle tested.
  • API frozen, new releases will not break your code.

Build with json replacement

Gin uses encoding/json as default json package but you can change it by build from other tags.

jsoniter

go build -tags=jsoniter .

go-json

go build -tags=go_json .

sonic (you have to ensure that your cpu support avx instruction.)

$ go build -tags="sonic avx" .

Build without MsgPack rendering feature

Gin enables MsgPack rendering feature by default. But you can disable this feature by specifying nomsgpack build tag.

go build -tags=nomsgpack .

This is useful to reduce the binary size of executable files. See the detail information.

API Examples

You can find a number of ready-to-run examples at Gin examples repository.

Using GET, POST, PUT, PATCH, DELETE and OPTIONS

func main() {
  // Creates a gin router with default middleware:
  // logger and recovery (crash-free) middleware
  router := gin.Default()

  router.GET("/someGet", getting)
  router.POST("/somePost", posting)
  router.PUT("/somePut", putting)
  router.DELETE("/someDelete", deleting)
  router.PATCH("/somePatch", patching)
  router.HEAD("/someHead", head)
  router.OPTIONS("/someOptions", options)

  // By default it serves on :8080 unless a
  // PORT environment variable was defined.
  router.Run()
  // router.Run(":3000") for a hard coded port
}

Parameters in path

func main() {
  router := gin.Default()

  // This handler will match /user/john but will not match /user/ or /user
  router.GET("/user/:name", func(c *gin.Context) {
    name := c.Param("name")
    c.String(http.StatusOK, "Hello %s", name)
  })

  // However, this one will match /user/john/ and also /user/john/send
  // If no other routers match /user/john, it will redirect to /user/john/
  router.GET("/user/:name/*action", func(c *gin.Context) {
    name := c.Param("name")
    action := c.Param("action")
    message := name + " is " + action
    c.String(http.StatusOK, message)
  })

  // For each matched request Context will hold the route definition
  router.POST("/user/:name/*action", func(c *gin.Context) {
    b := c.FullPath() == "/user/:name/*action" // true
    c.String(http.StatusOK, "%t", b)
  })

  // This handler will add a new router for /user/groups.
  // Exact routes are resolved before param routes, regardless of the order they were defined.
  // Routes starting with /user/groups are never interpreted as /user/:name/... routes
  router.GET("/user/groups", func(c *gin.Context) {
    c.String(http.StatusOK, "The available groups are [...]")
  })

  router.Run(":8080")
}

Querystring parameters

func main() {
  router := gin.Default()

  // Query string parameters are parsed using the existing underlying request object.
  // The request responds to an url matching:  /welcome?firstname=Jane&lastname=Doe
  router.GET("/welcome", func(c *gin.Context) {
    firstname := c.DefaultQuery("firstname", "Guest")
    lastname := c.Query("lastname") // shortcut for c.Request.URL.Query().Get("lastname")

    c.String(http.StatusOK, "Hello %s %s", firstname, lastname)
  })
  router.Run(":8080")
}

Multipart/Urlencoded Form

func main() {
  router := gin.Default()

  router.POST("/form_post", func(c *gin.Context) {
    message := c.PostForm("message")
    nick := c.DefaultPostForm("nick", "anonymous")

    c.JSON(http.StatusOK, gin.H{
      "status":  "posted",
      "message": message,
      "nick":    nick,
    })
  })
  router.Run(":8080")
}

Another example: query + post form

POST /post?id=1234&page=1 HTTP/1.1
Content-Type: application/x-www-form-urlencoded

name=manu&message=this_is_great
func main() {
  router := gin.Default()

  router.POST("/post", func(c *gin.Context) {

    id := c.Query("id")
    page := c.DefaultQuery("page", "0")
    name := c.PostForm("name")
    message := c.PostForm("message")

    fmt.Printf("id: %s; page: %s; name: %s; message: %s", id, page, name, message)
  })
  router.Run(":8080")
}
id: 1234; page: 1; name: manu; message: this_is_great

Map as querystring or postform parameters

POST /post?ids[a]=1234&ids[b]=hello HTTP/1.1
Content-Type: application/x-www-form-urlencoded

names[first]=thinkerou&names[second]=tianou
func main() {
  router := gin.Default()

  router.POST("/post", func(c *gin.Context) {

    ids := c.QueryMap("ids")
    names := c.PostFormMap("names")

    fmt.Printf("ids: %v; names: %v", ids, names)
  })
  router.Run(":8080")
}
ids: map[b:hello a:1234]; names: map[second:tianou first:thinkerou]

Upload files

Single file

References issue #774 and detail example code.

file.Filename SHOULD NOT be trusted. See Content-Disposition on MDN and #1693

The filename is always optional and must not be used blindly by the application: path information should be stripped, and conversion to the server file system rules should be done.

func main() {
  router := gin.Default()
  // Set a lower memory limit for multipart forms (default is 32 MiB)
  router.MaxMultipartMemory = 8 << 20  // 8 MiB
  router.POST("/upload", func(c *gin.Context) {
    // Single file
    file, _ := c.FormFile("file")
    log.Println(file.Filename)

    // Upload the file to specific dst.
    c.SaveUploadedFile(file, dst)

    c.String(http.StatusOK, fmt.Sprintf("'%s' uploaded!", file.Filename))
  })
  router.Run(":8080")
}

How to curl:

curl -X POST http://localhost:8080/upload \
  -F "[email protected]/Users/appleboy/test.zip" \
  -H "Content-Type: multipart/form-data"

Multiple files

See the detail example code.

func main() {
  router := gin.Default()
  // Set a lower memory limit for multipart forms (default is 32 MiB)
  router.MaxMultipartMemory = 8 << 20  // 8 MiB
  router.POST("/upload", func(c *gin.Context) {
    // Multipart form
    form, _ := c.MultipartForm()
    files := form.File["upload[]"]

    for _, file := range files {
      log.Println(file.Filename)

      // Upload the file to specific dst.
      c.SaveUploadedFile(file, dst)
    }
    c.String(http.StatusOK, fmt.Sprintf("%d files uploaded!", len(files)))
  })
  router.Run(":8080")
}

How to curl:

curl -X POST http://localhost:8080/upload \
  -F "upload[][email protected]/Users/appleboy/test1.zip" \
  -F "upload[][email protected]/Users/appleboy/test2.zip" \
  -H "Content-Type: multipart/form-data"

Grouping routes

func main() {
  router := gin.Default()

  // Simple group: v1
  v1 := router.Group("/v1")
  {
    v1.POST("/login", loginEndpoint)
    v1.POST("/submit", submitEndpoint)
    v1.POST("/read", readEndpoint)
  }

  // Simple group: v2
  v2 := router.Group("/v2")
  {
    v2.POST("/login", loginEndpoint)
    v2.POST("/submit", submitEndpoint)
    v2.POST("/read", readEndpoint)
  }

  router.Run(":8080")
}

Blank Gin without middleware by default

Use

r := gin.New()

instead of

// Default With the Logger and Recovery middleware already attached
r := gin.Default()

Using middleware

func main() {
  // Creates a router without any middleware by default
  r := gin.New()

  // Global middleware
  // Logger middleware will write the logs to gin.DefaultWriter even if you set with GIN_MODE=release.
  // By default gin.DefaultWriter = os.Stdout
  r.Use(gin.Logger())

  // Recovery middleware recovers from any panics and writes a 500 if there was one.
  r.Use(gin.Recovery())

  // Per route middleware, you can add as many as you desire.
  r.GET("/benchmark", MyBenchLogger(), benchEndpoint)

  // Authorization group
  // authorized := r.Group("/", AuthRequired())
  // exactly the same as:
  authorized := r.Group("/")
  // per group middleware! in this case we use the custom created
  // AuthRequired() middleware just in the "authorized" group.
  authorized.Use(AuthRequired())
  {
    authorized.POST("/login", loginEndpoint)
    authorized.POST("/submit", submitEndpoint)
    authorized.POST("/read", readEndpoint)

    // nested group
    testing := authorized.Group("testing")
    // visit 0.0.0.0:8080/testing/analytics
    testing.GET("/analytics", analyticsEndpoint)
  }

  // Listen and serve on 0.0.0.0:8080
  r.Run(":8080")
}

Custom Recovery behavior

func main() {
  // Creates a router without any middleware by default
  r := gin.New()

  // Global middleware
  // Logger middleware will write the logs to gin.DefaultWriter even if you set with GIN_MODE=release.
  // By default gin.DefaultWriter = os.Stdout
  r.Use(gin.Logger())

  // Recovery middleware recovers from any panics and writes a 500 if there was one.
  r.Use(gin.CustomRecovery(func(c *gin.Context, recovered interface{}) {
    if err, ok := recovered.(string); ok {
      c.String(http.StatusInternalServerError, fmt.Sprintf("error: %s", err))
    }
    c.AbortWithStatus(http.StatusInternalServerError)
  }))

  r.GET("/panic", func(c *gin.Context) {
    // panic with a string -- the custom middleware could save this to a database or report it to the user
    panic("foo")
  })

  r.GET("/", func(c *gin.Context) {
    c.String(http.StatusOK, "ohai")
  })

  // Listen and serve on 0.0.0.0:8080
  r.Run(":8080")
}

How to write log file

func main() {
    // Disable Console Color, you don't need console color when writing the logs to file.
    gin.DisableConsoleColor()

    // Logging to a file.
    f, _ := os.Create("gin.log")
    gin.DefaultWriter = io.MultiWriter(f)

    // Use the following code if you need to write the logs to file and console at the same time.
    // gin.DefaultWriter = io.MultiWriter(f, os.Stdout)

    router := gin.Default()
    router.GET("/ping", func(c *gin.Context) {
        c.String(http.StatusOK, "pong")
    })

    router.Run(":8080")
}

Custom Log Format

func main() {
  router := gin.New()

  // LoggerWithFormatter middleware will write the logs to gin.DefaultWriter
  // By default gin.DefaultWriter = os.Stdout
  router.Use(gin.LoggerWithFormatter(func(param gin.LogFormatterParams) string {

    // your custom format
    return fmt.Sprintf("%s - [%s] \"%s %s %s %d %s \"%s\" %s\"\n",
        param.ClientIP,
        param.TimeStamp.Format(time.RFC1123),
        param.Method,
        param.Path,
        param.Request.Proto,
        param.StatusCode,
        param.Latency,
        param.Request.UserAgent(),
        param.ErrorMessage,
    )
  }))
  router.Use(gin.Recovery())

  router.GET("/ping", func(c *gin.Context) {
    c.String(http.StatusOK, "pong")
  })

  router.Run(":8080")
}

Sample Output

::1 - [Fri, 07 Dec 2018 17:04:38 JST] "GET /ping HTTP/1.1 200 122.767µs "Mozilla/5.0 (Macintosh; Intel Mac OS X 10_11_6) AppleWebKit/537.36 (KHTML, like Gecko) Chrome/71.0.3578.80 Safari/537.36" "

Controlling Log output coloring

By default, logs output on console should be colorized depending on the detected TTY.

Never colorize logs:

func main() {
    // Disable log's color
    gin.DisableConsoleColor()

    // Creates a gin router with default middleware:
    // logger and recovery (crash-free) middleware
    router := gin.Default()

    router.GET("/ping", func(c *gin.Context) {
        c.String(http.StatusOK, "pong")
    })

    router.Run(":8080")
}

Always colorize logs:

func main() {
    // Force log's color
    gin.ForceConsoleColor()

    // Creates a gin router with default middleware:
    // logger and recovery (crash-free) middleware
    router := gin.Default()

    router.GET("/ping", func(c *gin.Context) {
        c.String(http.StatusOK, "pong")
    })

    router.Run(":8080")
}

Model binding and validation

To bind a request body into a type, use model binding. We currently support binding of JSON, XML, YAML, TOML and standard form values (foo=bar&boo=baz).

Gin uses go-playground/validator/v10 for validation. Check the full docs on tags usage here.

Note that you need to set the corresponding binding tag on all fields you want to bind. For example, when binding from JSON, set json:"fieldname".

Also, Gin provides two sets of methods for binding:

  • Type - Must bind
    • Methods - Bind, BindJSON, BindXML, BindQuery, BindYAML, BindHeader, BindTOML
    • Behavior - These methods use MustBindWith under the hood. If there is a binding error, the request is aborted with c.AbortWithError(400, err).SetType(ErrorTypeBind). This sets the response status code to 400 and the Content-Type header is set to text/plain; charset=utf-8. Note that if you try to set the response code after this, it will result in a warning [GIN-debug] [WARNING] Headers were already written. Wanted to override status code 400 with 422. If you wish to have greater control over the behavior, consider using the ShouldBind equivalent method.
  • Type - Should bind
    • Methods - ShouldBind, ShouldBindJSON, ShouldBindXML, ShouldBindQuery, ShouldBindYAML, ShouldBindHeader, ShouldBindTOML,
    • Behavior - These methods use ShouldBindWith under the hood. If there is a binding error, the error is returned and it is the developer's responsibility to handle the request and error appropriately.

When using the Bind-method, Gin tries to infer the binder depending on the Content-Type header. If you are sure what you are binding, you can use MustBindWith or ShouldBindWith.

You can also specify that specific fields are required. If a field is decorated with binding:"required" and has an empty value when binding, an error will be returned.

// Binding from JSON
type Login struct {
  User     string `form:"user" json:"user" xml:"user"  binding:"required"`
  Password string `form:"password" json:"password" xml:"password" binding:"required"`
}

func main() {
  router := gin.Default()

  // Example for binding JSON ({"user": "manu", "password": "123"})
  router.POST("/loginJSON", func(c *gin.Context) {
    var json Login
    if err := c.ShouldBindJSON(&json); err != nil {
      c.JSON(http.StatusBadRequest, gin.H{"error": err.Error()})
      return
    }

    if json.User != "manu" || json.Password != "123" {
      c.JSON(http.StatusUnauthorized, gin.H{"status": "unauthorized"})
      return
    }

    c.JSON(http.StatusOK, gin.H{"status": "you are logged in"})
  })

  // Example for binding XML (
  //  <?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?>
  //  <root>
  //    <user>manu</user>
  //    <password>123</password>
  //  </root>)
  router.POST("/loginXML", func(c *gin.Context) {
    var xml Login
    if err := c.ShouldBindXML(&xml); err != nil {
      c.JSON(http.StatusBadRequest, gin.H{"error": err.Error()})
      return
    }

    if xml.User != "manu" || xml.Password != "123" {
      c.JSON(http.StatusUnauthorized, gin.H{"status": "unauthorized"})
      return
    }

    c.JSON(http.StatusOK, gin.H{"status": "you are logged in"})
  })

  // Example for binding a HTML form (user=manu&password=123)
  router.POST("/loginForm", func(c *gin.Context) {
    var form Login
    // This will infer what binder to use depending on the content-type header.
    if err := c.ShouldBind(&form); err != nil {
      c.JSON(http.StatusBadRequest, gin.H{"error": err.Error()})
      return
    }

    if form.User != "manu" || form.Password != "123" {
      c.JSON(http.StatusUnauthorized, gin.H{"status": "unauthorized"})
      return
    }

    c.JSON(http.StatusOK, gin.H{"status": "you are logged in"})
  })

  // Listen and serve on 0.0.0.0:8080
  router.Run(":8080")
}

Sample request

$ curl -v -X POST \
  http://localhost:8080/loginJSON \
  -H 'content-type: application/json' \
  -d '{ "user": "manu" }'
> POST /loginJSON HTTP/1.1
> Host: localhost:8080
> User-Agent: curl/7.51.0
> Accept: */*
> content-type: application/json
> Content-Length: 18
>
* upload completely sent off: 18 out of 18 bytes
< HTTP/1.1 400 Bad Request
< Content-Type: application/json; charset=utf-8
< Date: Fri, 04 Aug 2017 03:51:31 GMT
< Content-Length: 100
<
{"error":"Key: 'Login.Password' Error:Field validation for 'Password' failed on the 'required' tag"}

Skip validate: when running the above example using the above the curl command, it returns error. Because the example use binding:"required" for Password. If use binding:"-" for Password, then it will not return error when running the above example again.

Custom Validators

It is also possible to register custom validators. See the example code.

package main

import (
  "net/http"
  "time"

  "github.com/gin-gonic/gin"
  "github.com/gin-gonic/gin/binding"
  "github.com/go-playground/validator/v10"
)

// Booking contains binded and validated data.
type Booking struct {
  CheckIn  time.Time `form:"check_in" binding:"required,bookabledate" time_format:"2006-01-02"`
  CheckOut time.Time `form:"check_out" binding:"required,gtfield=CheckIn" time_format:"2006-01-02"`
}

var bookableDate validator.Func = func(fl validator.FieldLevel) bool {
  date, ok := fl.Field().Interface().(time.Time)
  if ok {
    today := time.Now()
    if today.After(date) {
      return false
    }
  }
  return true
}

func main() {
  route := gin.Default()

  if v, ok := binding.Validator.Engine().(*validator.Validate); ok {
    v.RegisterValidation("bookabledate", bookableDate)
  }

  route.GET("/bookable", getBookable)
  route.Run(":8085")
}

func getBookable(c *gin.Context) {
  var b Booking
  if err := c.ShouldBindWith(&b, binding.Query); err == nil {
    c.JSON(http.StatusOK, gin.H{"message": "Booking dates are valid!"})
  } else {
    c.JSON(http.StatusBadRequest, gin.H{"error": err.Error()})
  }
}
$ curl "localhost:8085/bookable?check_in=2030-04-16&check_out=2030-04-17"
{"message":"Booking dates are valid!"}

$ curl "localhost:8085/bookable?check_in=2030-03-10&check_out=2030-03-09"
{"error":"Key: 'Booking.CheckOut' Error:Field validation for 'CheckOut' failed on the 'gtfield' tag"}

$ curl "localhost:8085/bookable?check_in=2000-03-09&check_out=2000-03-10"
{"error":"Key: 'Booking.CheckIn' Error:Field validation for 'CheckIn' failed on the 'bookabledate' tag"}%

Struct level validations can also be registered this way. See the struct-lvl-validation example to learn more.

Only Bind Query String

ShouldBindQuery function only binds the query params and not the post data. See the detail information.

package main

import (
  "log"
  "net/http"

  "github.com/gin-gonic/gin"
)

type Person struct {
  Name    string `form:"name"`
  Address string `form:"address"`
}

func main() {
  route := gin.Default()
  route.Any("/testing", startPage)
  route.Run(":8085")
}

func startPage(c *gin.Context) {
  var person Person
  if c.ShouldBindQuery(&person) == nil {
    log.Println("====== Only Bind By Query String ======")
    log.Println(person.Name)
    log.Println(person.Address)
  }
  c.String(http.StatusOK, "Success")
}

Bind Query String or Post Data

See the detail information.

package main

import (
  "log"
  "net/http"
  "time"

  "github.com/gin-gonic/gin"
)

type Person struct {
        Name       string    `form:"name"`
        Address    string    `form:"address"`
        Birthday   time.Time `form:"birthday" time_format:"2006-01-02" time_utc:"1"`
        CreateTime time.Time `form:"createTime" time_format:"unixNano"`
        UnixTime   time.Time `form:"unixTime" time_format:"unix"`
}

func main() {
  route := gin.Default()
  route.GET("/testing", startPage)
  route.Run(":8085")
}

func startPage(c *gin.Context) {
  var person Person
  // If `GET`, only `Form` binding engine (`query`) used.
  // If `POST`, first checks the `content-type` for `JSON` or `XML`, then uses `Form` (`form-data`).
  // See more at https://github.com/gin-gonic/gin/blob/master/binding/binding.go#L88
        if c.ShouldBind(&person) == nil {
                log.Println(person.Name)
                log.Println(person.Address)
                log.Println(person.Birthday)
                log.Println(person.CreateTime)
                log.Println(person.UnixTime)
        }

  c.String(http.StatusOK, "Success")
}

Test it with:

curl -X GET "localhost:8085/testing?name=appleboy&address=xyz&birthday=1992-03-15&createTime=1562400033000000123&unixTime=1562400033"

Bind Uri

See the detail information.

package main

import (
  "net/http"

  "github.com/gin-gonic/gin"
)

type Person struct {
  ID string `uri:"id" binding:"required,uuid"`
  Name string `uri:"name" binding:"required"`
}

func main() {
  route := gin.Default()
  route.GET("/:name/:id", func(c *gin.Context) {
    var person Person
    if err := c.ShouldBindUri(&person); err != nil {
      c.JSON(http.StatusBadRequest, gin.H{"msg": err.Error()})
      return
    }
    c.JSON(http.StatusOK, gin.H{"name": person.Name, "uuid": person.ID})
  })
  route.Run(":8088")
}

Test it with:

curl -v localhost:8088/thinkerou/987fbc97-4bed-5078-9f07-9141ba07c9f3
curl -v localhost:8088/thinkerou/not-uuid

Bind Header

package main

import (
  "fmt"
  "net/http"

  "github.com/gin-gonic/gin"
)

type testHeader struct {
  Rate   int    `header:"Rate"`
  Domain string `header:"Domain"`
}

func main() {
  r := gin.Default()
  r.GET("/", func(c *gin.Context) {
    h := testHeader{}

    if err := c.ShouldBindHeader(&h); err != nil {
      c.JSON(http.StatusOK, err)
    }

    fmt.Printf("%#v\n", h)
    c.JSON(http.StatusOK, gin.H{"Rate": h.Rate, "Domain": h.Domain})
  })

  r.Run()

// client
// curl -H "rate:300" -H "domain:music" 127.0.0.1:8080/
// output
// {"Domain":"music","Rate":300}
}

Bind HTML checkboxes

See the detail information

main.go

...

type myForm struct {
    Colors []string `form:"colors[]"`
}

...

func formHandler(c *gin.Context) {
    var fakeForm myForm
    c.ShouldBind(&fakeForm)
    c.JSON(http.StatusOK, gin.H{"color": fakeForm.Colors})
}

...

form.html

<form action="/" method="POST">
    <p>Check some colors</p>
    <label for="red">Red</label>
    <input type="checkbox" name="colors[]" value="red" id="red">
    <label for="green">Green</label>
    <input type="checkbox" name="colors[]" value="green" id="green">
    <label for="blue">Blue</label>
    <input type="checkbox" name="colors[]" value="blue" id="blue">
    <input type="submit">
</form>

result:

{"color":["red","green","blue"]}

Multipart/Urlencoded binding

type ProfileForm struct {
  Name   string                `form:"name" binding:"required"`
  Avatar *multipart.FileHeader `form:"avatar" binding:"required"`

  // or for multiple files
  // Avatars []*multipart.FileHeader `form:"avatar" binding:"required"`
}

func main() {
  router := gin.Default()
  router.POST("/profile", func(c *gin.Context) {
    // you can bind multipart form with explicit binding declaration:
    // c.ShouldBindWith(&form, binding.Form)
    // or you can simply use autobinding with ShouldBind method:
    var form ProfileForm
    // in this case proper binding will be automatically selected
    if err := c.ShouldBind(&form); err != nil {
      c.String(http.StatusBadRequest, "bad request")
      return
    }

    err := c.SaveUploadedFile(form.Avatar, form.Avatar.Filename)
    if err != nil {
      c.String(http.StatusInternalServerError, "unknown error")
      return
    }

    // db.Save(&form)

    c.String(http.StatusOK, "ok")
  })
  router.Run(":8080")
}

Test it with:

curl -X POST -v --form name=user --form "[email protected]/avatar.png" http://localhost:8080/profile

XML, JSON, YAML, TOML and ProtoBuf rendering

func main() {
  r := gin.Default()

  // gin.H is a shortcut for map[string]interface{}
  r.GET("/someJSON", func(c *gin.Context) {
    c.JSON(http.StatusOK, gin.H{"message": "hey", "status": http.StatusOK})
  })

  r.GET("/moreJSON", func(c *gin.Context) {
    // You also can use a struct
    var msg struct {
      Name    string `json:"user"`
      Message string
      Number  int
    }
    msg.Name = "Lena"
    msg.Message = "hey"
    msg.Number = 123
    // Note that msg.Name becomes "user" in the JSON
    // Will output  :   {"user": "Lena", "Message": "hey", "Number": 123}
    c.JSON(http.StatusOK, msg)
  })

  r.GET("/someXML", func(c *gin.Context) {
    c.XML(http.StatusOK, gin.H{"message": "hey", "status": http.StatusOK})
  })

  r.GET("/someYAML", func(c *gin.Context) {
    c.YAML(http.StatusOK, gin.H{"message": "hey", "status": http.StatusOK})
  })

  r.GET("/someTOML", func(c *gin.Context) {
    c.TOML(http.StatusOK, gin.H{"message": "hey", "status": http.StatusOK})
  })

  r.GET("/someProtoBuf", func(c *gin.Context) {
    reps := []int64{int64(1), int64(2)}
    label := "test"
    // The specific definition of protobuf is written in the testdata/protoexample file.
    data := &protoexample.Test{
      Label: &label,
      Reps:  reps,
    }
    // Note that data becomes binary data in the response
    // Will output protoexample.Test protobuf serialized data
    c.ProtoBuf(http.StatusOK, data)
  })

  // Listen and serve on 0.0.0.0:8080
  r.Run(":8080")
}

SecureJSON

Using SecureJSON to prevent json hijacking. Default prepends "while(1)," to response body if the given struct is array values.

func main() {
  r := gin.Default()

  // You can also use your own secure json prefix
  // r.SecureJsonPrefix(")]}',\n")

  r.GET("/someJSON", func(c *gin.Context) {
    names := []string{"lena", "austin", "foo"}

    // Will output  :   while(1);["lena","austin","foo"]
    c.SecureJSON(http.StatusOK, names)
  })

  // Listen and serve on 0.0.0.0:8080
  r.Run(":8080")
}

JSONP

Using JSONP to request data from a server in a different domain. Add callback to response body if the query parameter callback exists.

func main() {
  r := gin.Default()

  r.GET("/JSONP", func(c *gin.Context) {
    data := gin.H{
      "foo": "bar",
    }

    //callback is x
    // Will output  :   x({\"foo\":\"bar\"})
    c.JSONP(http.StatusOK, data)
  })

  // Listen and serve on 0.0.0.0:8080
  r.Run(":8080")

        // client
        // curl http://127.0.0.1:8080/JSONP?callback=x
}

AsciiJSON

Using AsciiJSON to Generates ASCII-only JSON with escaped non-ASCII characters.

func main() {
  r := gin.Default()

  r.GET("/someJSON", func(c *gin.Context) {
    data := gin.H{
      "lang": "GO语言",
      "tag":  "<br>",
    }

    // will output : {"lang":"GO\u8bed\u8a00","tag":"\u003cbr\u003e"}
    c.AsciiJSON(http.StatusOK, data)
  })

  // Listen and serve on 0.0.0.0:8080
  r.Run(":8080")
}

PureJSON

Normally, JSON replaces special HTML characters with their unicode entities, e.g. < becomes \u003c. If you want to encode such characters literally, you can use PureJSON instead. This feature is unavailable in Go 1.6 and lower.

func main() {
  r := gin.Default()

  // Serves unicode entities
  r.GET("/json", func(c *gin.Context) {
    c.JSON(http.StatusOK, gin.H{
      "html": "<b>Hello, world!</b>",
    })
  })

  // Serves literal characters
  r.GET("/purejson", func(c *gin.Context) {
    c.PureJSON(http.StatusOK, gin.H{
      "html": "<b>Hello, world!</b>",
    })
  })

  // listen and serve on 0.0.0.0:8080
  r.Run(":8080")
}

Serving static files

func main() {
  router := gin.Default()
  router.Static("/assets", "./assets")
  router.StaticFS("/more_static", http.Dir("my_file_system"))
  router.StaticFile("/favicon.ico", "./resources/favicon.ico")
  router.StaticFileFS("/more_favicon.ico", "more_favicon.ico", http.Dir("my_file_system"))
  
  // Listen and serve on 0.0.0.0:8080
  router.Run(":8080")
}

Serving data from file

func main() {
  router := gin.Default()

  router.GET("/local/file", func(c *gin.Context) {
    c.File("local/file.go")
  })

  var fs http.FileSystem = // ...
  router.GET("/fs/file", func(c *gin.Context) {
    c.FileFromFS("fs/file.go", fs)
  })
}

Serving data from reader

func main() {
  router := gin.Default()
  router.GET("/someDataFromReader", func(c *gin.Context) {
    response, err := http.Get("https://raw.githubusercontent.com/gin-gonic/logo/master/color.png")
    if err != nil || response.StatusCode != http.StatusOK {
      c.Status(http.StatusServiceUnavailable)
      return
    }

    reader := response.Body
     defer reader.Close()
    contentLength := response.ContentLength
    contentType := response.Header.Get("Content-Type")

    extraHeaders := map[string]string{
      "Content-Disposition": `attachment; filename="gopher.png"`,
    }

    c.DataFromReader(http.StatusOK, contentLength, contentType, reader, extraHeaders)
  })
  router.Run(":8080")
}

HTML rendering

Using LoadHTMLGlob() or LoadHTMLFiles()

func main() {
  router := gin.Default()
  router.LoadHTMLGlob("templates/*")
  //router.LoadHTMLFiles("templates/template1.html", "templates/template2.html")
  router.GET("/index", func(c *gin.Context) {
    c.HTML(http.StatusOK, "index.tmpl", gin.H{
      "title": "Main website",
    })
  })
  router.Run(":8080")
}

templates/index.tmpl

<html>
  <h1>
    {{ .title }}
  </h1>
</html>

Using templates with same name in different directories

func main() {
  router := gin.Default()
  router.LoadHTMLGlob("templates/**/*")
  router.GET("/posts/index", func(c *gin.Context) {
    c.HTML(http.StatusOK, "posts/index.tmpl", gin.H{
      "title": "Posts",
    })
  })
  router.GET("/users/index", func(c *gin.Context) {
    c.HTML(http.StatusOK, "users/index.tmpl", gin.H{
      "title": "Users",
    })
  })
  router.Run(":8080")
}

templates/posts/index.tmpl

{{ define "posts/index.tmpl" }}
<html><h1>
  {{ .title }}
</h1>
<p>Using posts/index.tmpl</p>
</html>
{{ end }}

templates/users/index.tmpl

{{ define "users/index.tmpl" }}
<html><h1>
  {{ .title }}
</h1>
<p>Using users/index.tmpl</p>
</html>
{{ end }}

Custom Template renderer

You can also use your own html template render

import "html/template"

func main() {
  router := gin.Default()
  html := template.Must(template.ParseFiles("file1", "file2"))
  router.SetHTMLTemplate(html)
  router.Run(":8080")
}

Custom Delimiters

You may use custom delims

  r := gin.Default()
  r.Delims("{[{", "}]}")
  r.LoadHTMLGlob("/path/to/templates")

Custom Template Funcs

See the detail example code.

main.go

import (
    "fmt"
    "html/template"
    "net/http"
    "time"

    "github.com/gin-gonic/gin"
)

func formatAsDate(t time.Time) string {
    year, month, day := t.Date()
    return fmt.Sprintf("%d/%02d/%02d", year, month, day)
}

func main() {
    router := gin.Default()
    router.Delims("{[{", "}]}")
    router.SetFuncMap(template.FuncMap{
        "formatAsDate": formatAsDate,
    })
    router.LoadHTMLFiles("./testdata/template/raw.tmpl")

    router.GET("/raw", func(c *gin.Context) {
        c.HTML(http.StatusOK, "raw.tmpl", gin.H{
            "now": time.Date(2017, 07, 01, 0, 0, 0, 0, time.UTC),
        })
    })

    router.Run(":8080")
}

raw.tmpl

Date: {[{.now | formatAsDate}]}

Result:

Date: 2017/07/01

Multitemplate

Gin allow by default use only one html.Template. Check a multitemplate render for using features like go 1.6 block template.

Redirects

Issuing a HTTP redirect is easy. Both internal and external locations are supported.

r.GET("/test", func(c *gin.Context) {
  c.Redirect(http.StatusMovedPermanently, "http://www.google.com/")
})

Issuing a HTTP redirect from POST. Refer to issue: #444

r.POST("/test", func(c *gin.Context) {
  c.Redirect(http.StatusFound, "/foo")
})

Issuing a Router redirect, use HandleContext like below.

r.GET("/test", func(c *gin.Context) {
    c.Request.URL.Path = "/test2"
    r.HandleContext(c)
})
r.GET("/test2", func(c *gin.Context) {
    c.JSON(http.StatusOK, gin.H{"hello": "world"})
})

Custom Middleware

func Logger() gin.HandlerFunc {
  return func(c *gin.Context) {
    t := time.Now()

    // Set example variable
    c.Set("example", "12345")

    // before request

    c.Next()

    // after request
    latency := time.Since(t)
    log.Print(latency)

    // access the status we are sending
    status := c.Writer.Status()
    log.Println(status)
  }
}

func main() {
  r := gin.New()
  r.Use(Logger())

  r.GET("/test", func(c *gin.Context) {
    example := c.MustGet("example").(string)

    // it would print: "12345"
    log.Println(example)
  })

  // Listen and serve on 0.0.0.0:8080
  r.Run(":8080")
}

Using BasicAuth() middleware

// simulate some private data
var secrets = gin.H{
  "foo":    gin.H{"email": "[email protected]", "phone": "123433"},
  "austin": gin.H{"email": "[email protected]", "phone": "666"},
  "lena":   gin.H{"email": "[email protected]", "phone": "523443"},
}

func main() {
  r := gin.Default()

  // Group using gin.BasicAuth() middleware
  // gin.Accounts is a shortcut for map[string]string
  authorized := r.Group("/admin", gin.BasicAuth(gin.Accounts{
    "foo":    "bar",
    "austin": "1234",
    "lena":   "hello2",
    "manu":   "4321",
  }))

  // /admin/secrets endpoint
  // hit "localhost:8080/admin/secrets
  authorized.GET("/secrets", func(c *gin.Context) {
    // get user, it was set by the BasicAuth middleware
    user := c.MustGet(gin.AuthUserKey).(string)
    if secret, ok := secrets[user]; ok {
      c.JSON(http.StatusOK, gin.H{"user": user, "secret": secret})
    } else {
      c.JSON(http.StatusOK, gin.H{"user": user, "secret": "NO SECRET :("})
    }
  })

  // Listen and serve on 0.0.0.0:8080
  r.Run(":8080")
}

Goroutines inside a middleware

When starting new Goroutines inside a middleware or handler, you SHOULD NOT use the original context inside it, you have to use a read-only copy.

func main() {
  r := gin.Default()

  r.GET("/long_async", func(c *gin.Context) {
    // create copy to be used inside the goroutine
    cCp := c.Copy()
    go func() {
      // simulate a long task with time.Sleep(). 5 seconds
      time.Sleep(5 * time.Second)

      // note that you are using the copied context "cCp", IMPORTANT
      log.Println("Done! in path " + cCp.Request.URL.Path)
    }()
  })

  r.GET("/long_sync", func(c *gin.Context) {
    // simulate a long task with time.Sleep(). 5 seconds
    time.Sleep(5 * time.Second)

    // since we are NOT using a goroutine, we do not have to copy the context
    log.Println("Done! in path " + c.Request.URL.Path)
  })

  // Listen and serve on 0.0.0.0:8080
  r.Run(":8080")
}

Custom HTTP configuration

Use http.ListenAndServe() directly, like this:

func main() {
  router := gin.Default()
  http.ListenAndServe(":8080", router)
}

or

func main() {
  router := gin.Default()

  s := &http.Server{
    Addr:           ":8080",
    Handler:        router,
    ReadTimeout:    10 * time.Second,
    WriteTimeout:   10 * time.Second,
    MaxHeaderBytes: 1 << 20,
  }
  s.ListenAndServe()
}

Support Let's Encrypt

example for 1-line LetsEncrypt HTTPS servers.

package main

import (
  "log"
  "net/http"

  "github.com/gin-gonic/autotls"
  "github.com/gin-gonic/gin"
)

func main() {
  r := gin.Default()

  // Ping handler
  r.GET("/ping", func(c *gin.Context) {
    c.String(http.StatusOK, "pong")
  })

  log.Fatal(autotls.Run(r, "example1.com", "example2.com"))
}

example for custom autocert manager.

package main

import (
  "log"
  "net/http"

  "github.com/gin-gonic/autotls"
  "github.com/gin-gonic/gin"
  "golang.org/x/crypto/acme/autocert"
)

func main() {
  r := gin.Default()

  // Ping handler
  r.GET("/ping", func(c *gin.Context) {
    c.String(http.StatusOK, "pong")
  })

  m := autocert.Manager{
    Prompt:     autocert.AcceptTOS,
    HostPolicy: autocert.HostWhitelist("example1.com", "example2.com"),
    Cache:      autocert.DirCache("/var/www/.cache"),
  }

  log.Fatal(autotls.RunWithManager(r, &m))
}

Run multiple service using Gin

See the question and try the following example:

package main

import (
  "log"
  "net/http"
  "time"

  "github.com/gin-gonic/gin"
  "golang.org/x/sync/errgroup"
)

var (
  g errgroup.Group
)

func router01() http.Handler {
  e := gin.New()
  e.Use(gin.Recovery())
  e.GET("/", func(c *gin.Context) {
    c.JSON(
      http.StatusOK,
      gin.H{
        "code":  http.StatusOK,
        "error": "Welcome server 01",
      },
    )
  })

  return e
}

func router02() http.Handler {
  e := gin.New()
  e.Use(gin.Recovery())
  e.GET("/", func(c *gin.Context) {
    c.JSON(
      http.StatusOK,
      gin.H{
        "code":  http.StatusOK,
        "error": "Welcome server 02",
      },
    )
  })

  return e
}

func main() {
  server01 := &http.Server{
    Addr:         ":8080",
    Handler:      router01(),
    ReadTimeout:  5 * time.Second,
    WriteTimeout: 10 * time.Second,
  }

  server02 := &http.Server{
    Addr:         ":8081",
    Handler:      router02(),
    ReadTimeout:  5 * time.Second,
    WriteTimeout: 10 * time.Second,
  }

  g.Go(func() error {
    err := server01.ListenAndServe()
    if err != nil && err != http.ErrServerClosed {
      log.Fatal(err)
    }
    return err
  })

  g.Go(func() error {
    err := server02.ListenAndServe()
    if err != nil && err != http.ErrServerClosed {
      log.Fatal(err)
    }
    return err
  })

  if err := g.Wait(); err != nil {
    log.Fatal(err)
  }
}

Graceful shutdown or restart

There are a few approaches you can use to perform a graceful shutdown or restart. You can make use of third-party packages specifically built for that, or you can manually do the same with the functions and methods from the built-in packages.

Third-party packages

We can use fvbock/endless to replace the default ListenAndServe. Refer to issue #296 for more details.

router := gin.Default()
router.GET("/", handler)
// [...]
endless.ListenAndServe(":4242", router)

Alternatives:

  • grace: Graceful restart & zero downtime deploy for Go servers.
  • graceful: Graceful is a Go package enabling graceful shutdown of an http.Handler server.
  • manners: A polite Go HTTP server that shuts down gracefully.

Manually

In case you are using Go 1.8 or a later version, you may not need to use those libraries. Consider using http.Server's built-in Shutdown() method for graceful shutdowns. The example below describes its usage, and we've got more examples using gin here.

// +build go1.8

package main

import (
  "context"
  "log"
  "net/http"
  "os"
  "os/signal"
  "syscall"
  "time"

  "github.com/gin-gonic/gin"
)

func main() {
  router := gin.Default()
  router.GET("/", func(c *gin.Context) {
    time.Sleep(5 * time.Second)
    c.String(http.StatusOK, "Welcome Gin Server")
  })

  srv := &http.Server{
    Addr:    ":8080",
    Handler: router,
  }

  // Initializing the server in a goroutine so that
  // it won't block the graceful shutdown handling below
  go func() {
    if err := srv.ListenAndServe(); err != nil && !errors.Is(err, http.ErrServerClosed) {
      log.Printf("listen: %s\n", err)
    }
  }()

  // Wait for interrupt signal to gracefully shutdown the server with
  // a timeout of 5 seconds.
  quit := make(chan os.Signal)
  // kill (no param) default send syscall.SIGTERM
  // kill -2 is syscall.SIGINT
  // kill -9 is syscall.SIGKILL but can't be caught, so don't need to add it
  signal.Notify(quit, syscall.SIGINT, syscall.SIGTERM)
  <-quit
  log.Println("Shutting down server...")

  // The context is used to inform the server it has 5 seconds to finish
  // the request it is currently handling
  ctx, cancel := context.WithTimeout(context.Background(), 5*time.Second)
  defer cancel()

  if err := srv.Shutdown(ctx); err != nil {
    log.Fatal("Server forced to shutdown:", err)
  }

  log.Println("Server exiting")
}

Build a single binary with templates

You can build a server into a single binary containing templates by using the embed package.

package main

import (
  "embed"
  "html/template"
  "net/http"

  "github.com/gin-gonic/gin"
)

//go:embed assets/* templates/*
var f embed.FS

func main() {
  router := gin.Default()
  templ := template.Must(template.New("").ParseFS(f, "templates/*.tmpl", "templates/foo/*.tmpl"))
  router.SetHTMLTemplate(templ)

  // example: /public/assets/images/example.png
  router.StaticFS("/public", http.FS(f))

  router.GET("/", func(c *gin.Context) {
    c.HTML(http.StatusOK, "index.tmpl", gin.H{
      "title": "Main website",
    })
  })

  router.GET("/foo", func(c *gin.Context) {
    c.HTML(http.StatusOK, "bar.tmpl", gin.H{
      "title": "Foo website",
    })
  })

  router.GET("favicon.ico", func(c *gin.Context) {
    file, _ := f.ReadFile("assets/favicon.ico")
    c.Data(
      http.StatusOK,
      "image/x-icon",
      file,
    )
  })

  router.Run(":8080")
}

See a complete example in the https://github.com/gin-gonic/examples/tree/master/assets-in-binary/example02 directory.

Bind form-data request with custom struct

The follow example using custom struct:

type StructA struct {
    FieldA string `form:"field_a"`
}

type StructB struct {
    NestedStruct StructA
    FieldB string `form:"field_b"`
}

type StructC struct {
    NestedStructPointer *StructA
    FieldC string `form:"field_c"`
}

type StructD struct {
    NestedAnonyStruct struct {
        FieldX string `form:"field_x"`
    }
    FieldD string `form:"field_d"`
}

func GetDataB(c *gin.Context) {
    var b StructB
    c.Bind(&b)
    c.JSON(http.StatusOK, gin.H{
        "a": b.NestedStruct,
        "b": b.FieldB,
    })
}

func GetDataC(c *gin.Context) {
    var b StructC
    c.Bind(&b)
    c.JSON(http.StatusOK, gin.H{
        "a": b.NestedStructPointer,
        "c": b.FieldC,
    })
}

func GetDataD(c *gin.Context) {
    var b StructD
    c.Bind(&b)
    c.JSON(http.StatusOK, gin.H{
        "x": b.NestedAnonyStruct,
        "d": b.FieldD,
    })
}

func main() {
    r := gin.Default()
    r.GET("/getb", GetDataB)
    r.GET("/getc", GetDataC)
    r.GET("/getd", GetDataD)

    r.Run()
}

Using the command curl command result:

$ curl "http://localhost:8080/getb?field_a=hello&field_b=world"
{"a":{"FieldA":"hello"},"b":"world"}
$ curl "http://localhost:8080/getc?field_a=hello&field_c=world"
{"a":{"FieldA":"hello"},"c":"world"}
$ curl "http://localhost:8080/getd?field_x=hello&field_d=world"
{"d":"world","x":{"FieldX":"hello"}}

Try to bind body into different structs

The normal methods for binding request body consumes c.Request.Body and they cannot be called multiple times.

type formA struct {
  Foo string `json:"foo" xml:"foo" binding:"required"`
}

type formB struct {
  Bar string `json:"bar" xml:"bar" binding:"required"`
}

func SomeHandler(c *gin.Context) {
  objA := formA{}
  objB := formB{}
  // This c.ShouldBind consumes c.Request.Body and it cannot be reused.
  if errA := c.ShouldBind(&objA); errA == nil {
    c.String(http.StatusOK, `the body should be formA`)
  // Always an error is occurred by this because c.Request.Body is EOF now.
  } else if errB := c.ShouldBind(&objB); errB == nil {
    c.String(http.StatusOK, `the body should be formB`)
  } else {
    ...
  }
}

For this, you can use c.ShouldBindBodyWith.

func SomeHandler(c *gin.Context) {
  objA := formA{}
  objB := formB{}
  // This reads c.Request.Body and stores the result into the context.
  if errA := c.ShouldBindBodyWith(&objA, binding.Form); errA == nil {
    c.String(http.StatusOK, `the body should be formA`)
  // At this time, it reuses body stored in the context.
  } else if errB := c.ShouldBindBodyWith(&objB, binding.JSON); errB == nil {
    c.String(http.StatusOK, `the body should be formB JSON`)
  // And it can accepts other formats
  } else if errB2 := c.ShouldBindBodyWith(&objB, binding.XML); errB2 == nil {
    c.String(http.StatusOK, `the body should be formB XML`)
  } else {
    ...
  }
}
  1. c.ShouldBindBodyWith stores body into the context before binding. This has a slight impact to performance, so you should not use this method if you are enough to call binding at once.
  2. This feature is only needed for some formats -- JSON, XML, MsgPack, ProtoBuf. For other formats, Query, Form, FormPost, FormMultipart, can be called by c.ShouldBind() multiple times without any damage to performance (See #1341).

Bind form-data request with custom struct and custom tag

const (
  customerTag = "url"
  defaultMemory = 32 << 20
)

type customerBinding struct {}

func (customerBinding) Name() string {
  return "form"
}

func (customerBinding) Bind(req *http.Request, obj interface{}) error {
  if err := req.ParseForm(); err != nil {
    return err
  }
  if err := req.ParseMultipartForm(defaultMemory); err != nil {
    if err != http.ErrNotMultipart {
      return err
    }
  }
  if err := binding.MapFormWithTag(obj, req.Form, customerTag); err != nil {
    return err
  }
  return validate(obj)
}

func validate(obj interface{}) error {
  if binding.Validator == nil {
    return nil
  }
  return binding.Validator.ValidateStruct(obj)
}

// Now we can do this!!!
// FormA is an external type that we can't modify it's tag
type FormA struct {
  FieldA string `url:"field_a"`
}

func ListHandler(s *Service) func(ctx *gin.Context) {
  return func(ctx *gin.Context) {
    var urlBinding = customerBinding{}
    var opt FormA
    err := ctx.MustBindWith(&opt, urlBinding)
    if err != nil {
      ...
    }
    ...
  }
}

http2 server push

http.Pusher is supported only go1.8+. See the golang blog for detail information.

package main

import (
  "html/template"
  "log"
  "net/http"

  "github.com/gin-gonic/gin"
)

var html = template.Must(template.New("https").Parse(`
<html>
<head>
  <title>Https Test</title>
  <script src="/assets/app.js"></script>
</head>
<body>
  <h1 style="color:red;">Welcome, Ginner!</h1>
</body>
</html>
`))

func main() {
  r := gin.Default()
  r.Static("/assets", "./assets")
  r.SetHTMLTemplate(html)

  r.GET("/", func(c *gin.Context) {
    if pusher := c.Writer.Pusher(); pusher != nil {
      // use pusher.Push() to do server push
      if err := pusher.Push("/assets/app.js", nil); err != nil {
        log.Printf("Failed to push: %v", err)
      }
    }
    c.HTML(http.StatusOK, "https", gin.H{
      "status": "success",
    })
  })

  // Listen and Server in https://127.0.0.1:8080
  r.RunTLS(":8080", "./testdata/server.pem", "./testdata/server.key")
}

Define format for the log of routes

The default log of routes is:

[GIN-debug] POST   /foo                      --> main.main.func1 (3 handlers)
[GIN-debug] GET    /bar                      --> main.main.func2 (3 handlers)
[GIN-debug] GET    /status                   --> main.main.func3 (3 handlers)

If you want to log this information in given format (e.g. JSON, key values or something else), then you can define this format with gin.DebugPrintRouteFunc. In the example below, we log all routes with standard log package but you can use another log tools that suits of your needs.

import (
  "log"
  "net/http"

  "github.com/gin-gonic/gin"
)

func main() {
  r := gin.Default()
  gin.DebugPrintRouteFunc = func(httpMethod, absolutePath, handlerName string, nuHandlers int) {
    log.Printf("endpoint %v %v %v %v\n", httpMethod, absolutePath, handlerName, nuHandlers)
  }

  r.POST("/foo", func(c *gin.Context) {
    c.JSON(http.StatusOK, "foo")
  })

  r.GET("/bar", func(c *gin.Context) {
    c.JSON(http.StatusOK, "bar")
  })

  r.GET("/status", func(c *gin.Context) {
    c.JSON(http.StatusOK, "ok")
  })

  // Listen and Server in http://0.0.0.0:8080
  r.Run()
}

Set and get a cookie

import (
    "fmt"

    "github.com/gin-gonic/gin"
)

func main() {

    router := gin.Default()

    router.GET("/cookie", func(c *gin.Context) {

        cookie, err := c.Cookie("gin_cookie")

        if err != nil {
            cookie = "NotSet"
            c.SetCookie("gin_cookie", "test", 3600, "/", "localhost", false, true)
        }

        fmt.Printf("Cookie value: %s \n", cookie)
    })

    router.Run()
}

Don't trust all proxies

Gin lets you specify which headers to hold the real client IP (if any), as well as specifying which proxies (or direct clients) you trust to specify one of these headers.

Use function SetTrustedProxies() on your gin.Engine to specify network addresses or network CIDRs from where clients which their request headers related to client IP can be trusted. They can be IPv4 addresses, IPv4 CIDRs, IPv6 addresses or IPv6 CIDRs.

Attention: Gin trust all proxies by default if you don't specify a trusted proxy using the function above, this is NOT safe. At the same time, if you don't use any proxy, you can disable this feature by using Engine.SetTrustedProxies(nil), then Context.ClientIP() will return the remote address directly to avoid some unnecessary computation.

import (
  "fmt"

  "github.com/gin-gonic/gin"
)

func main() {

  router := gin.Default()
  router.SetTrustedProxies([]string{"192.168.1.2"})

  router.GET("/", func(c *gin.Context) {
    // If the client is 192.168.1.2, use the X-Forwarded-For
    // header to deduce the original client IP from the trust-
    // worthy parts of that header.
    // Otherwise, simply return the direct client IP
    fmt.Printf("ClientIP: %s\n", c.ClientIP())
  })
  router.Run()
}

Notice: If you are using a CDN service, you can set the Engine.TrustedPlatform to skip TrustedProxies check, it has a higher priority than TrustedProxies. Look at the example below:

import (
  "fmt"

  "github.com/gin-gonic/gin"
)

func main() {

  router := gin.Default()
  // Use predefined header gin.PlatformXXX
  router.TrustedPlatform = gin.PlatformGoogleAppEngine
  // Or set your own trusted request header for another trusted proxy service
  // Don't set it to any suspect request header, it's unsafe
  router.TrustedPlatform = "X-CDN-IP"

  router.GET("/", func(c *gin.Context) {
    // If you set TrustedPlatform, ClientIP() will resolve the
    // corresponding header and return IP directly
    fmt.Printf("ClientIP: %s\n", c.ClientIP())
  })
  router.Run()
}

Testing

The net/http/httptest package is preferable way for HTTP testing.

package main

import (
  "net/http"

  "github.com/gin-gonic/gin"
)

func setupRouter() *gin.Engine {
  r := gin.Default()
  r.GET("/ping", func(c *gin.Context) {
    c.String(http.StatusOK, "pong")
  })
  return r
}

func main() {
  r := setupRouter()
  r.Run(":8080")
}

Test for code example above:

package main

import (
  "net/http"
  "net/http/httptest"
  "testing"

  "github.com/stretchr/testify/assert"
)

func TestPingRoute(t *testing.T) {
  router := setupRouter()

  w := httptest.NewRecorder()
  req, _ := http.NewRequest(http.MethodGet, "/ping", nil)
  router.ServeHTTP(w, req)

  assert.Equal(t, http.StatusOK, w.Code)
  assert.Equal(t, "pong", w.Body.String())
}

Users

Awesome project lists using Gin web framework.

  • gorush: A push notification server written in Go.
  • fnproject: The container native, cloud agnostic serverless platform.
  • photoprism: Personal photo management powered by Go and Google TensorFlow.
  • lura: Ultra performant API Gateway with middlewares.
  • picfit: An image resizing server written in Go.
  • brigade: Event-based Scripting for Kubernetes.
  • dkron: Distributed, fault tolerant job scheduling system.

gin's People

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gin's Issues

Content negotiation

My application will serve an API that is available via JSON and XML. There is currently not a convenient way of doing this in Gin. As it is now, I end up with a bunch of switch-cases.

What do you guys say about supporting (maybe a basic implementation) content negotiation (conneg)[0]?

The most simple API could look something like this:

r.GET("/ping", func(c *gin.Context) {
    c.Negotiate(200, Response{foo: "Bar"})
})

The response format is then inferred from the Accept-header.

We could also implement a mechanism to try and infer what to return based on URL parameters (/api/?format=xml/json) or file endings (api.json/xml).

Is this something you guys want to move forward with? If so, let me know and I'll implement it.

[0] http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Content_negotiation

Can't unmarshal JSON array with c.EnsureBody

trying this:

var json []api.Patch
if c.EnsureBody(&json) {
    ... 

and i'm getting this:

2014/07/09 15:33:07 PANIC: reflect: NumField of non-struct type
/usr/local/go/src/pkg/reflect/type.go:658 (0x4ad079)
    (*rtype).NumField: panic("reflect: NumField of non-struct type")
/home/ben/go/src/github.com/gin-gonic/gin/binding/binding.go:164 (0x540c5b)
    Validate: for i := 0; i < typ.NumField(); i++ {
/home/ben/go/src/github.com/gin-gonic/gin/binding/binding.go:37 (0x53fc01)
    jsonBinding.Bind: return Validate(obj)
<autogenerated>:2 (0x5413ba)

undefined: sync.Pool error

go get github.com/gin-gonic/gin                                                                                                                      
# github.com/gin-gonic/gin
../go/src/github.com/gin-gonic/gin/gin.go:74: undefined: sync.Pool

sync.Pool seems to be introduced in go1.3 meaning gin no longer works with Google App Engine, drone.io and others running go1.2.

Is this intentional?

Important performance improvement

I just tested a new system to reduce the allocation and garbage collection overhead.

Some benchmarks:

Current (old) system:

BenchmarkGin_Param   5000000           340 ns/op         161 B/op          2 allocs/op
BenchmarkGin_Param5  5000000           537 ns/op         290 B/op          2 allocs/op
BenchmarkGin_Param20     1000000          1278 ns/op         774 B/op          2 allocs/op
BenchmarkGin_ParamWrite  5000000           384 ns/op         161 B/op          2 allocs/op
BenchmarkGin_GithubStatic   10000000           239 ns/op         128 B/op          1 allocs/op

New system:

BenchmarkGin_Param  10000000           249 ns/op          33 B/op          1 allocs/op
BenchmarkGin_Param5  5000000           442 ns/op         162 B/op          1 allocs/op
BenchmarkGin_Param20     1000000          1102 ns/op         646 B/op          1 allocs/op
BenchmarkGin_ParamWrite  5000000           319 ns/op          33 B/op          1 allocs/op
BenchmarkGin_GithubStatic   10000000           167 ns/op           0 B/op          0 allocs/op

But this is even better.

  • It also reduces drastically the garbage collection stress in a full-loaded system.
  • This system allows the community to extend the gin.Context (adding more static variables etc...) without degrading the performance
  • The implementation is still hacky, the performance can be even better once we make this system CPU cache friendly

Binding doesn't support multipart/form-data

context.go only supports application/x-www-form-urlencoded for forms:
case c.Request.Method == "GET" || ctype == MIMEPOSTForm:
b = binding.Form

[GIN] 2014/09/01 - 03:48:13 | 400 | 248.788us | 172.4.231.9 POST /post
Error #1: unknown content-type: multipart/form-data
Meta: Operation aborted

the router not overrite

if you register the router
r.GET("/test/:name", func(c *gin.Context) {
name := c.Params.ByName("name")
c.String(200, "the parmas are"+name)
})
this will error when compiling, they can't coexist!
r.GET("/test/json", func(c *gin.Context) {
c.String(200, "this will error because the router top")
})

gorilla websocket error

I am trying to use gin with gorilla/websocket:

func ServeSocket(c *gin.Context) {
    conn, err := websocket.Upgrade(c.Writer, c.Request, nil, 1024, 1024)
    if err != nil {
        http.Error(w, "Websocket error", 400)
        fmt.Println(err)
        return
    }
}

But I am getting an error: websocket: response does not implement http.Hijacker.

As I see, there is no Hijack method on c.Writer, maybe it should be added? Or please tell my how can I use it without changing gin code. Thanks.

A better way to send an error as JSON/XML, canceling next handlers

I've been trying naively to send a 400 http status code with a JSON message in it, adding proper headers as "application/json" and a body with a proper error message. The first thing I thought was using c.JSON(400, gin.H{"error": "error here"}) but if this appears in a middleware, and there are new handlers or middlewares following up, I receive http: multiple response.WriteHeader calls from the logs.

I assume the problem is that actually there's nothing underlying preventing to execute next middlewares / handlers if I send an error. I've checked the auth.go file with the basic auth middleware but that's only sending a 401 header, with no body at all.

So I've ended up doing this:

c.Writer.Header().Add("Content-Type", "application/json")
c.Fail(404, errors.New(errorMessage))
c.JSON(-1, gin.H{"error": errorMessage})

So I append first the proper JSON header, then calling fail (so, underlying the function properly cancels all the subsequent middlewares / handlers) and then, after a quick check to the JSON method, I've seen that if the header is 0 or up, the header gets added, but since I've already added one on c.Fail() I don't want a new one, so I pass -1.

Is there a proper way to send this? I mean, there's a shorthand for proper JSON responses but nothing that actually ends the subsequent middlewares even if I want to send a response body there.

Organize a decent template system

I know this might be caused by my lack of experience or the way html/template works, but I cannot figure how I could get:

  1. an easy to maintain hierarchical template structure
  2. how to organize this so that I can easily use it from the app.

In my ideal world:

  1. I could have a base.tmpl
  2. this could be extended/customized in final templates
  3. templates would be organized in a directory hierarchy that emulates the URL structure (so over time it's easy to figure out where to look for things

I have tried something very similar to what was described in #27, but haven't been able to get it to work.

Update: I got the solution described in #27 to work.

I'm not suggesting gin to implement from scratch a templating engine, but:

  1. I'd really find very helpful seeing a more realistic use of templates
  2. if this is not doable/optimal with html/template only then maybe recommending a solution.

Inability to use '/' for static files

Hi,

I'm very sad to find out that gin doesn't allow you to have '/' as your top level route for static files. Almost every single web framework out there assumes that the static files you have inside your project are going to be served from $static_dir and they will be mapped as HTTP routes from '/'. An example from express.js does this:

server.use(express.static(__dirname + '/public'));

Doing that maps "/index.html" to "public/index.html". Expected behavior. Any other frameworks like Rails or Martini have this convention as well. Basically it means that if you have the following files inside a "./public" directory:

--- public/
 |
 |--- index.html
 |--- css/
 |      |--- app.css

Files will be accessible with HTTP requests like $server_url/index.html or $server_url/css/app.css. Gin disallows you to do this (although the problem lies in httprouter), and forces you to have a separate (non-top-level) route for public/static files like:

router.Static("/static", "/var/www")

So, if I use this:

router.Static("/", "/var/www")

I get this panic:

panic: wildcard route conflicts with existing children

goroutine 16 [running]:
runtime.panic(0x2d5da0, 0xc2080013a0)
    /usr/local/go/src/pkg/runtime/panic.c:279 +0xf5
github.com/julienschmidt/httprouter.(*node).insertChild(0xc208004360, 0xc208001302, 0xc208040de1, 0x10, 0xc208040e20)
    /Users/cachafla/Code/Go/go/src/github.com/julienschmidt/httprouter/tree.go:201 +0x11e
github.com/julienschmidt/httprouter.(*node).addRoute(0xc208004360, 0xc208040de1, 0x10, 0xc208040e20)
    /Users/cachafla/Code/Go/go/src/github.com/julienschmidt/httprouter/tree.go:172 +0x952
github.com/julienschmidt/httprouter.(*Router).Handle(0xc208040c60, 0x3ce8b0, 0x3, 0xc208040de0, 0x11, 0xc208040e20)
    /Users/cachafla/Code/Go/go/src/github.com/julienschmidt/httprouter/router.go:205 +0x186
github.com/gin-gonic/gin.(*RouterGroup).Handle(0xc208070340, 0x3ce8b0, 0x3, 0xc208040de0, 0x11, 0xc2080380a0, 0x1, 0x1)
    /Users/cachafla/Code/Go/go/src/github.com/gin-gonic/gin/gin.go:223 +0x477
github.com/gin-gonic/gin.(*RouterGroup).GET(0xc208070340, 0xc208040d40, 0x11, 0xc2080380a0, 0x1, 0x1)
    /Users/cachafla/Code/Go/go/src/github.com/gin-gonic/gin/gin.go:233 +0x6d
github.com/gin-gonic/gin.(*RouterGroup).Static(0xc208070340, 0xc208040d40, 0x11, 0x3eed10, 0x8)
    /Users/cachafla/Code/Go/go/src/github.com/gin-gonic/gin/gin.go:276 +0x252

It might seem silly, but this is actually an incorrect behavior for defining a static directory to be served by the HTTP server. The router should be able to handle multiple matching routes, as almost any other HTTP library out there In my case, I really need my index.html to be /index.html and not /static/index.html.

In any case, I understand that this comes from a predefined httprouter behavior and I acknowledge that I could use a prefix and "deal with it", but I would prefer if this worked as it should. If somebody has any tips on how to workaround this issue I would really appreciate it, thanks!

Logged Intrusion?

I started poking around with the samples locally to test a few things to use gin for an API handler. Anyways, the live logger in my terminal started reporting activity after an hour of inactivity. Logs are below:

[email protected]:/var/go/src/hello$ go run main.go
2014/07/05 12:55:26 / in 129.33us
2014/07/05 12:55:44 / in 128.017us
2014/07/05 12:55:45 /favicon.ico in 880ns
2014/07/05 12:56:04 / in 40.44us
2014/07/05 13:11:55 http://best-proxies.ru/azenv.php?rand=7374898ec89df9a63dcf8f                                                                                        0aac549df5 in 1.063us
2014/07/05 13:12:21 http://92.222.28.46/httptest.php in 654ns
2014/07/05 13:12:21 http://www.google.com/search?q=wp.pl in 621ns

The snippet I was running in main.go is as follows:

 package main
 import "github.com/gin-gonic/gin"

 func main() {
     r := gin.Default()
     r.GET("/", func(c *gin.Context){
         c.JSON(200, gin.H{"message": "hello world!", "success": true})
     })
     r.Run(":8080")
 }

I installed Go 1.3 using GVM on Ubuntu 12.04, completely up to date on all other system binaries and no other point of intrusion other than right there. What could have caused those logs to show that? Keep in mind those logs are all from gin's logger.

Any ideas?

Go1.3 only support?

I was experimenting with the new sync.Pool. It will make Gin a little bit faster running in a single core and much faster when running in several cores.

Sadly sync.Poolis only available in Go1.3. So if Gin uses it, we can't support 1.2.

What do you guys think? would you have any problem with that?

JSON does not set the correct Content-Type header

Hi,

I'm experimenting with Gin and stumbled on some problems. The code below does not result in a Content-Type: application/json being set in the response.

func main() {
    r := gin.Default()
    r.GET("/test", func(c *gin.Context) {
        c.JSON(200, gin.H{"status": "you are logged in"})
    })

    r.Run(":8082")
}

Response:

HTTP/1.1 200 OK
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=utf-8
Content-Length: 6
Date: Tue, 01 Jul 2014 07:13:36 GMT

I've tried fixing the issue myself but i cannot find a way to set a header. All headers are just ignored.

Anyone else experiencing the same problem?

I'm on Go 1.1 on Windows so that might have something to do with it.

[Binding] Embedded struct fails required condition

The following will not be caught by binding.JSON.Bind()

type T struct {
    Embedded E `json:"embedded" binding:"required"`
}

type E struct {
    Field string `json:"field_name"`
}

The expected error would be "Required Embedded"
If we change E to

type E struct {
    Field string `json:"field_name" binding:"required"`
}

it will be caught with the error message "Required Field", with no information about that Field resides in an embedded struct .

iota results in missing parameter

Synopsis:
When using iota to default a const group to a 0 value, and sending a 0 value via a JSON payload, the binding process fails believing the required value is missing.

Schema:

const (
    EventTypeEntry = iota
    EventTypeExit
)

Event struct {
        Type      int    `bson:"type" json:"type" binding:"required"`
        Timestamp string `bson:"timestamp" json:"timestamp" binding:"required"`
    }

JSON:

{
    "events": [
        {
            "timestamp": "2014-08-18T14:03:26.761-0400",
            "type": 0
        }
    ]
}

Response:

[GIN] 2014/08/18 - 14:08:03 | 400 |     78.894us | 127.0.0.1:52575 POST /v1/events
Error #01: Required Type 
     Meta: Operation aborted

c.Html(...) default suffix

I hope the suffix will be defautl as ".tmpl", so I can use like c.Html(200,"index",nil) ,this will find index.tmpl, if c.Html(200,"index.html".nil) will find the index.html.
ps: i'm not a english user, so my English is very bad, please forgive me

Setup of gin with Google App Engine

I don't seem to be able to setup gin with GAE. I understand that the trunk is Go1.3, but checking out the app_engine branch and running go install results in an error too:

go install
deprecated.go:4:2: cannot find package "github.com/gin-gonic/gin/binding" in any of:
    /usr/local/Cellar/go/1.2.2/libexec/src/pkg/github.com/gin-gonic/gin/binding (from $GOROOT)
    /Users/apopescu/Dropbox/workspace/golang/sportscal/src/github.com/gin-gonic/gin/binding (from $GOPATH)
    /Users/apopescu/.golang/src/github.com/gin-gonic/gin/binding
go env
GOARCH="amd64"
GOBIN=""
GOCHAR="6"
GOEXE=""
GOHOSTARCH="amd64"
GOHOSTOS="darwin"
GOOS="darwin"
GOPATH="/Users/apopescu/Dropbox/workspace/golang/sportscal:/Users/apopescu/.golang"
GORACE=""
GOROOT="/usr/local/Cellar/go/1.2.2/libexec"
GOTOOLDIR="/usr/local/Cellar/go/1.2.2/libexec/pkg/tool/darwin_amd64"
TERM="dumb"
CC="clang"
GOGCCFLAGS="-g -O2 -fPIC -m64 -pthread -fno-caret-diagnostics -Qunused-arguments -fno-common"
CXX="clang++"
CGO_ENABLED="1"

How to write request test ?

Use std and http handler can write following test case, but how to do similar thing in gin ?

I think the main point should be how to create a request and response and fill it into gin's Context structure...

package main

  import (
    "net/http"
    "net/http/httptest"
    "testing"
  )

func IndexHandler(res http.ResponseWriter, req *http.Request) {
    data, _ := json.Marshal("{'hello':'wercker!'}")
    res.Header().Set("Content-Type", "application/json; charset=utf-8")
    res.Write(data)
}

func TestHandleIndexReturnsWithStatusOK(t *testing.T) {
    request, _ := http.NewRequest("GET", "/", nil)
    response := httptest.NewRecorder()

    IndexHandler(response, request)

    if response.Code != http.StatusOK {
        t.Fatalf("Non-expected status code%v:\n\tbody: %v", "200", response.Code)
    }
}

encoding/xml cannot marshal maps

This code from the documentation:

r.GET("/someXML", func(c *gin.Context) {
    c.XML(200, gin.H{"message": "hey", "status": 200})
})

Will result in a xml: unsupported type: gin.H error.

Marshalling a specific type would of course work:

type Response struct {
        Name string
}
c.XML(200, Response{"Alexander Nyquist"})

// <Response><Name>Alexander Nyquist</Name></Response>

Unable to get http response code in middle ware.

If I wanted to create a simple logger to mimic apache access logs, it is currently impossible to get the written status code. http.ResponseWriter's implementation is http.response which is unexported. As such there is no way to get to it's also unexported http.response.status.

You can get the entire header map from http.ResponseWriter.Header() however it won't give you anything about the status because it never actually gets written to that map.

Mimicking apache access logs may not be ideal, but I will surely want to record the return code in some way.

Some (broken) sample code trying to implement a proper access_log logger.

 func Logger() gin.HandlerFunc {
    return func(c *gin.Context) {
        t := time.Now()
        ip, err := net.ResolveTCPAddr("tcp", c.Req.RemoteAddr)
        if err != nil {
            c.Abort(500)
        }

        // before request
        c.Next()
        // after request

        var user string
        if c.Req.URL.User != nil {
            user = c.Req.URL.User.Username()
        } else {
            user = "-"
        }

        latency := time.Since(t)
        statusCode := c.Writer.(*http.Response).StatusCode
        //statusCode := c.Writer.(*http.response).status
        log.Print(latency)
        fmt.Printf("%v - %v [%v] \"%v %v %v\" %v %v\n",
            ip.IP, user, t, c.Req.Method, c.Req.URL.Path,
            c.Req.Proto, statusCode, c.Req.ContentLength)
    }
}

go get failing

When running

go get github.com/gin-gonic/gin

I get an error, seems master branch is broken

# github.com/gin-gonic/gin
../../gin-gonic/gin/gin.go:74: undefined: sync.Pool

Session Mgmt?

Hi,

Any plans to support session management like github.com/gorilla/sessions?

Pluggable view renderer

Hi Guys,

I've been playing with the framework and overal I really like it. One point where I think it's lacking is a pluggable view rendering engine. The engine struct is currently tied to HTMLTemplate so it's not really easy to switch it out and use a different implementation when appropriate. Wouldn't it be better to introduce interfaces for these components? Say, for instance, in the case of the view rendering you'd use an interface:

type ViewRenderer interface {
    ExecuteTemplate(wr io.Writer, name string, data interface{}) error
}

// And engine being
Engine struct {
       *RouterGroup
       HtmlRenderer ViewRenderer
       cache sync.Pool
       handlers404 []HandlerFunc
       router *httprouter.Router
}

This way, by default, you'd be able to just assign an html/template instance for a 'batteries included' approach while maintaining the performance characteristics because you don't incur a performance penalty for wrapping the default template package.

People (like me) who'd like a little bit more functionality in the view engine could just easily swap out the default html/template package and encapsulate/augment it with more advanced layout functionality for instance. Or use a different view renderer all together of course.

I'd be more than happy to work on this and submit a pull request but I'd rather start a discussion first to see if this a direction you'd be willing to go.

Disclaimer: I'm a go noob so if this is not really 'idiomatic' go, please correct me :)

Rename context.EnsureBody() to context.ValidateBody()

I feel like the current method name is not pretty clear.

Right now, we have two methods for JSON validation (XML validation is coming soon).

func (c *Context) ParseBody(item interface{}) error

and

func (c *Context) EnsureBody(item interface{}) bool

https://github.com/gin-gonic/gin/blob/master/gin.go#L281-L298

The first one ParseBody() unmarshal the JSON stream and also validates it, if an error occurred it is returned, otherwise, nil is returned.

The second one EnsureBody() calls ParseBody() internally, if an error occurred, a 400 error is automatically responded, and a false boolean is returned. This means that using EnsureBody() you only should handle the "true" case.

        if c.EnsureBody(&json) == true {
            // do something important
            c.JSON(200, gin.H{"status": "ok"})
        } else {
            // pointless
        }

if you need to manage the false statement, ParseBody() is the way to go.

        if err := c.ParseBody(&json); err == nil {
            // do something important
            c.JSON(200, gin.H{"status": "ok"})
        } else {
            // do stuff with err ;)
        }

The idea is to rename EnsureBody() to

func (c *Context) ValidateBody(item interface{}) bool

thoughts?

Change c.Req to c.Request similar to c.Writer

Hi,

So, this is not an urgent request, but I think it's only fair to call things in their actual names.

store.Get(c.Request,"session-name")
// instead of
store.Get(c.Req,"session-name")

I'm not going to go crazy about it and request something like this 😄

Context struct {
    Request   *http.Request
    ResponseWriter   http.ResponseWriter
...

but this improve the readability of the context, and indicate that these are the http request and writer.

Development mode

IDEAS

  • HTML rendering without cache.
  • Additional logging
    • Log existing routes
    • Log listening port

API

  • Debug mode by default
  • Using an environment variable called GIN_MODE that is loaded at init time.
$ export GIN_MODE=release
  • Developer-API.
    Any call to this method would replace the default option.
gin.SetMode(gin.DebugMode)

Log example:

~ $ go run test.go
[GIN-debug] POST  /v1/login                 --> main.loginEndpoint (3 handlers)
[GIN-debug] POST  /v1/submit                --> main.submitEndpoint (3 handlers)
[GIN-debug] GET   /v1/read                  --> main.readEndpoint (3 handlers)
[GIN-debug] Listening and serving HTTP on :8080

URL with the trailing slash

I can't specify a URL with a slash at the end: router.GET("/login/", login).

prefix := path.Join(group.prefix, component) in func (group *RouterGroup) Group(...) and p = path.Join(group.prefix, p) in func (group *RouterGroup) Handle(...) removes the trailing slash.

How can I use websocket

Hello! Thank you for cool framework!

I use code.google.com/p/go.net/websocket package

http.Handle("/socket", websocket.Handler(echoHandler))

How can I handle websocket with gin?

Support for 405 Method Not Allowed

Would be great to easy add support for status 405, specially when creating a REST API.

And do you have any example adding a more verbose access logger? Logging response-code, user-agent, client-ip, etc?

Keep up the good work! 👍

r.group not working

I made a quick test with custom middleware groups:

func TestHandle() gin.HandlerFunc {
    return func(c *gin.Context) {
        fmt.Printf("TEST: \n" )

        c.Next()

        fmt.Printf("TEST2: \n" )
    }
}

 r.Group("/", TestHandle()) {
        r.GET("/test", func(c *gin.Context) {
            fmt.Printf("test")
            c.String(200, "ok")
        })
}

TEST and TEST2 never gets printed.

I do get a warning:
[GIN] WARNING. Headers were already written!

Any ideas ?

google group creation, please!

Hi guys,

Just passing here to ask you guys, when you have some time, to create a google group.
I think it is very usefull and it will be nice to keep reading and helping the users through there.

You guys should be there with Gorilla, Revel, Martini and others...

ROADMAP for 0.2

Roadmap for 0.2

  • Performance improments, reduce allocation and garbage collection overhead
  • Fix bugs
  • Ask our designer for a cool logo
  • Add tons of unit tests and benchmarks
  • Improve logging system
  • Improve JSON/XML validation using bindings
  • Improve XML support
  • Improve documentation
  • Add more cool middlewares, for example redis catching (this also helps developers to understand the framework)

I will create an issue for each one if it was not created yet and link them from here.

How can I use html template?

Hello.
Thank you for sharing nice framework.

I wonder how can I use html template in gin framework.

I've tried below,

html := template.ParseFiles("file1", "file2")
r.HTMLTemplates = html

Then I've got an error bellow.

multiple-value "html/template".ParseFiles() in single-value context

And I've researched bit more.
Finally discovered Context.HTML.

func render(c *gin.Context) {
    c.HTML(200, "template/index.html", gin.H{})
}

but it gave me a blank page.

How can I use html template?

Issue with custom CORS header middleware

I have created a the following middleware function but It doesn't seem to be working properly. When I do an options request I get a 404 and I get http: multiple response.WriteHeader calls in my console.

func CORSMiddleware() gin.HandlerFunc {
    return func(c *gin.Context) {

        c.Writer.Header().Set("Content-Type", "application/json")
        c.Writer.Header().Set("Access-Control-Allow-Origin", "*")
        c.Writer.Header().Set("Access-Control-Allow-Headers", "Content-Type, Content-Length, Accept-Encoding, X-CSRF-Token, Authorization")
        if c.Req.Method == "OPTIONS" {
            fmt.Println("options")
            c.Abort(200)
            return
        }
        // c.Next()
    }
}

I have mounted it as the before anything else with the following.

r.Use(CORSMiddleware())

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